Ocorreu um erro. Detalhes Ocultar
Você tem páginas não gravadas. Restaurar Cancelar

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international economic organisation of 34 countries founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. It is a forum of countries committed to democracy and the market economy, providing a platform to compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practices and co-ordinate domestic and international policies of its members.

Todos os conjuntos de dados:  E G N O P S T
  • E
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 05 julho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Tables show earmarked grants classified into the 10 functions (or policy areas) for which they are disbursed. Functions are the same as used in the Classification of Functions of Government (COFOG) by the System of National Accounts. A 'miscellaneous' category has been added to these 10 functions to allow for situations where a precise breakdown by function is not available.
  • G
  • N
  • O
  • P
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 julho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The OECD has collected data for public expenditure on labour market programmes (LMPs) continuously since the mid-1980s. For most longstanding Member countries, data according to a consistent classification system and definition of scope are available for reference years 1985 to 2002. Starting with reference year 1998, Eurostat started collecting and publishing data according to a somewhat different classification system and definition of scope. In line with agreements for bilateral coordination of data collection, the OECD after some time adopted - for non-Eurostat OECD Member countries as well as Eurostat countries – most of the features of the Eurostat system. This allows the OECD to use data collected by Eurostat rather than making a separate data request to the 20 Eurostat countries that are members of the OECD. OECD data according to the "new" classification and definition of scope are generally available for reference year 2002 onwards, or 1998 onwards for Eurostat countries. These data are often used in time-series applications, e.g. for documenting long-term trends in total social expenditure (ìn which labour market programmes are one component), or in time-series regressions that attempt to estimate the impact of training programmes vs. job-creation programmes on unemployment. It is no longer practicable to do such work using only the "old" data which stop in 2002 or the "new" data which start in 2002 or 1998. If the two data sets are combined using crude extrapolation and splicing techniques, time-series movements will result primarily from statistical breaks (i.e. changes in definition and coverage of the statistics) rather than real changes in spending patterns. The unit of measure used depends on the members in dimension 'Country', 'Measure'
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 05 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      OECD National Account Statistics are based on the System of National of Accounts (SNA), a set of internationally agreed concepts, definitions, classifications and rules for national accounting. Using SNA terminology, general government revenue consists of central, state and local governments, and social security funds. State government is only applicable to the nine OECD member countries that are federal states: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Mexico, Spain (considered a de facto federal state in the National Accounts data), Switzerland and the United States. Revenues encompass social contributions (e.g. contributions for pensions, health and social security), taxes other than social contributions (e.g. taxes on consumption, income, wealth, property and capital), and grants and other revenues. Grants can be from foreign governments, international organizations or other general government units. Other revenues include sales, fees, property income and subsidies. The aggregates presented (taxes other than social contributions, social contributions, and grants and other revenues) are not directly available in the OECD National Accounts, and were constructed using sub-account line items.
  • S
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 05 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The subnational government finance dataset presents data on the institutional organisation at local and regional levels as well as on public finance. Financial data cover the general government sector and subnational government subsector (state and local government levels) in the 35 OECD member countries and in the EU. Four main dimensions are presented: expenditure (including investment), revenue, budget balance and debt. The dataset is released as a beta version. Data at country level are derived mainly from the OECD National Accounts harmonised according to the new standards of the System of National Accounts (SNA) 2008, implemented by most OECD countries since December 2014. They are complemented by data from Eurostat, IMF (Australia, Chile), and national statistical institutes for some countries or indicators (in particular, territorial organisation). Data were extracted in February 2017 and are from 2015, unless otherwise specified
  • T
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 21 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The term "tax autonomy" captures the freedom sub-central governments (SCG) have over their own taxes.   Tax autonomy data for 2002, 2005 and 2008 is classified into 11 categories and sub-categories and ranges from full taxing power to no taxing power at all. The classification is shown below :   a.1 - The recipient SCG can set the tax rate and any tax reliefs without needing to consult a higher level government. a.2 - The recipient SCG can set the rate and any reliefs after consulting a higher level government. b.1 - The recipient SCG can set the tax rate, and a higher level government does not set upper or lower limits on the rate chosen. b.2 - The recipient SCG can set the tax rate, and a higher level government does set upper and/or lower limits on the rate chosen. c - The recipient SCG can set some tax reliefs (tax allowances and/or tax credits) but not tax rates. d.1 - There is a tax-sharing arrangement in which the SCGs determine the revenue split. d.2 - There is a tax-sharing arrangement in which the revenue split can be changed only with the consent of SCGs. d.3 - There is a tax-sharing arrangement in which the revenue split can be changed unilaterally by a higher level government, but less frequently than once a year. d.4 - There is a tax-sharing arrangement in which the revenue split is determined annually by a higher level government. e - Other cases in which the central government sets the rate and base of the SCG tax. f - None of the above categories a, b, c, d or e applies.   In the data for 1995, there is only one category under each of the headings a and b as follows: a - The recipient SCG can set the tax rate and any tax reliefs. b - The recipient SCG can set the tax rate.

Nossa declaração de privacidade e política de cookies

O nosso website utiliza cookies para facilitar a sua experiência online. Eles foram salvos no seu computador quando você lançou este site. Você pode modificar suas configurações pessoais para cookies através das configurações do seu navegador de Internet.

Política de Privacidade