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International Monetary Fund

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization that was initiated in 1944 at the Bretton Woods Conference and formally created in 1945 by 29 member countries. The IMF's stated goal was to assist in the reconstruction of the world's international payment system post–World War II. The IMF currently has a near-global membership of 188 countries. To become a member, a country must apply and then be accepted by a majority of the existing members. Upon joining, each member country of the IMF is assigned a quota, based broadly on its relative size in the world economy. The IMF provides policy advice and financing to members in economic difficulties and also works with developing nations to help them achieve macroeconomic stability and reduce poverty.

Todos os conjuntos de dados:  F G M P
  • F
    • abril 2019
      Fonte: International Monetary Fund
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 11 abril, 2019
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      The Financial Soundness Indicators (FSIs) were developed by the IMF, together with the international community, with aim of supporting analysis and assessing strengths and vulnerabilities of financial systems. The Statistics Department of the IMF, disseminates data and metadata on selected FSIs provided by participating countries. For a description of the various FSIs, as well as the consolidation basis, consolidation adjustments, and accounting rules followed, please refer to the concepts and definitions document in the document tab. Reporting countries compile FSI data using different methodologies, which may also vary for different points in time for the same country. Users are advised to consult the accompanying metadata to conduct more meaning cross-country comparisons or to assess the evolution of a given FSI for any of the countries.
    • abril 2019
      Fonte: International Monetary Fund
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 04 abril, 2019
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      The Reporting entities dataset provides information on the structure, size, and coverage of the financial institutions that are used for compiling financial soundness indicators. It provides a better understanding of the structure of the reporting entities in terms of the type of institution, number of entities, size of assets, and type of control. Reporting entities are domestically incorporated entities but are divided into two: domestically controlled and foreign controlled. The concepts of residency criterion and control are determined based on FSI Guide methodology which is in line with international best practices such as Systems of National Accounts. Data on reporting entities cover the branches, subsidiaries and the value of asset for both domestically and foreign controlled entities resident in the reporting country together their resident and non-resident subsidiaries.
  • G
    • outubro 2018
      Fonte: International Monetary Fund
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 07 dezembro, 2018
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      The October 2018 Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) finds that global near-term risks to financial stability have increased somewhat, reflecting mounting pressures in emerging market economies and escalating trade tensions. These risks, while still moderate, could increase significantly. An intensification of concerns about emerging markets, a broader rise in trade tensions, the realization of political and policy uncertainty, or a faster-than-expected tightening in monetary normalization could all lead to a sharp tightening in financial conditions. Medium-term financial stability risks remain elevated, driven by high non–financial sector leverage in advanced economies and rising external borrowing in emerging markets. Although the global banking system is stronger than before the crisis, it is exposed to highly indebted borrowers as well as to opaque and illiquid assets and foreign currency rollover risks. This all raises the urgency for policymakers to step up efforts to boost the financial system’s resilience by completing the financial regulatory reform agenda as well as developing and deploying macroprudential policy tools. This GFSR also takes stock of global regulatory reform 10 years after the global financial crisis. It reviews the main precrisis failings in financial sector oversight and assesses the progress in implementation of the reform agenda designed to address these failings. It also looks at whether shifts in market structure and risks in the global financial system since the crisis have been in the direction the new regulatory agenda intended, that is, toward greater safety. It finds that the broad agenda set by the international community has given rise to new standards that have contributed to a more resilient financial system—one that is less leveraged, more liquid, and better and more intensively supervised, especially at large banks. The forms of shadow banking more closely related to the global financial crisis have been curtailed, and most countries now have macro prudential authorities and some tools with which to oversee and contain risks to the whole financial system. The chapter also identifies areas in which consolidation or further progress is needed and warns against rolling back reforms, which might make the global financial system less safe.
  • M
    • abril 2019
      Fonte: International Monetary Fund
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 08 abril, 2019
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      The Monetary and Financial Statistics (MFS) database contains the aggregated surveys covering: i) Central Bank ii) Depository Corporations and iii) Other Financial Corporations. The key macroeconomic aggregates in this dataset include: i) Monetary base and broad money; ii) Credit aggregates (including credit to the private sector); and iii) Foreign assets and liabilities.   Beginning in 2009, there are two presentations of Monetary Statistics in IFS. The new presentation data follows the Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual (MFSM) and the Monetary and Financial Statistics Compilation Guide (MFSCG), a companion to the MFSM that contains more detailed coverage of the classification, economic sectorization, valuation, and recording of financial assets and liabilities in an economy. The MFSCG gives prominence to the source data for monetary and financial statistics.   The majority of countries use the standardized report forms (SRFs) to report monetary data to the IMF and are presented under SRF Countries.   The old presentation is used for those countries that do not use the SRFs for reporting Monetary data and presented under Non-SRF Countries. The presentation of these countries will be changed to the new presentation when the countries implement the reporting of SRF-based data.   The Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual and Compilation Guide (Manual) updates and merges into one volume methodological and practical aspects of the compilation process for monetary and financial statistics (MFS). Aimed at compilers and users of MFS, it offers a conceptual framework for the collection, compilation, and analytical presentation of monetary data, which provide a critical input for monetary policy formulation and monitoring.   Detailed monetary statistics based on the standardized report forms reflecting the conceptual framework of the above Manual and its predecessors.
  • P