Ocorreu um erro. Detalhes Ocultar
Você tem páginas não gravadas. Restaurar Cancelar

Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

Todos os conjuntos de dados:  A C E I P R S T
  • A
    • outubro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 07 outubro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 14 outubro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat collects road transport statistics by two means: 1. Data on infrastructure, transport equipment, enterprises, economic performance, employment, traffic, aggregated data on transport of passengers and goods as well as data on accidents are collected using the Common Questionnaire of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), Eurostat and the International Transport Forum (ITF, in the framework of OECD). The method of the Common Questionnaire data collection is presented in a separate document. 2. Data on carriage of goods by road, using heavy goods vehicles, are based on a continuum of legal acts: 2.1 Data collection on carriage of goods by road until 1998 (included) was based on Directives 78/546/EEC and 89/462/EEC and covered tonnes and tonne-kilometres only. 2.2 Data since the reference period 1999 are derived from micro-data collected in the framework of Regulation (EU) No 70/2012 of the European parliament and of the council on statistical returns in respect of the carriage of goods by road, a recast ofCouncil Regulation (EC) 1172/98 which has replaced the previous Directives. The figures are aggregated on the basis of sample surveys carried out by the reporting countries. The data cover tonnes, tonne-kilometres, vehicle-kilometres and numbers of journeys. These metadata pages only refer to road freight statistics based on the European Union's legal acts (point 2 above) and, in particular, to the data for reference years 1999 and after (2.2).
  • C
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 março, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
  • E
  • I
    • março 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • P
    • setembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 outubro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Short-term statistics (STS) give information on a wide range of economic activities according to NACE Rev.2 classification (Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community). The industrial import price indices offer information according to the CPA classification (Statistical Classification of Products by Activity in the European Economic Community). Construction indices are broken down by Classification of Types of Constructions (CC). All data under this heading are index data. Percentage changes are also available for each indicator. The index data are generally presented in the following forms: UnadjustedCalendar adjustedSeasonally adjusted Depending on the STS regulation data are accessible as monthly, quarterly and annual data. This heading covers the indicators listed below in four different sectors. Based on the national data, Eurostat compiles EU and euro area infra-annual economic statistics. Among these, a list of indicators, called Principal European Economic Indicators (PEEIs) has been identified by key users as being of prime importance for the conduct of monetary and economic policy of the euro area. These indicators are mainly released through Eurostat's website under the heading Euro-indicators. There are eight PEEIs contributed by STS and they are marked with * in the text below. INDUSTRYProduction (volume)*Turnover: Total, Domestic market and Non-domestic market==> A further breakdown of the non-domestic turnover into euro area and non euro area is available for the euro area countriesProducer prices (output prices)*: Total, Domestic market and Non-domestic market==> A further breakdown of the non-domestic producer prices into euro area and non euro area is available for the euro area countriesImport prices*: Total, Euro area market, Non euro area market (euro area countries only)Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salariesCONSTRUCTIONProduction (volume)*: Total of the construction sector, Building construction, Civil EngineeringBuilding permits indicators*: Number of dwellings, Square meters of useful floor (or alternative size measure)Construction costs or prices: Construction costs, Material costs, Labour costs (if not available, they may be approximated by the Producer (output) prices variable)Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salariesWHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADEVolume of sales (deflated turnover)*Turnover (value)Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salariesSERVICESTurnover (in value)*Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salariesProducer prices (Output prices )* National reference metadata of the reporting countries can be found in the Annexes of this metadata file.
    • abril 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 abril, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
  • R
  • S
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 março, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Production and trade in wood and paper products: - Primary products: roundwood, sawnwood, chips, residues, pellets, veneers, glulam, wood-based panels, pulp, paper, recovered paper and paperboard - Secondary products: further processed wood and paper products (only trade value) Sources: questionnaire jointly used by Eurostat, FAO, UN ECE and ITTO (Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire, JFSQ, EU version with extra worksheets); Eurostat's trade database COMEXT for unreported data on trade and the table on imports of tropical wood; Eurostat's PRODCOM data for production totals of selected products.
  • T
    • dezembro 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 fevereiro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Inland waterway transport statistics provides information on the volume and performance of freight transport on EU inland waterway network. They are reported on the basis of the "territoriality principle" which means that each country reports the loading, unloading and movements of goods that take place on its national territory, irrespective of country of origins of undertakings or place of first loading and final unloading.   The full data provision obligation includes:annually: goods transport by type of goods, by nationality of vessels and by type of vessel as well as container transport by type of goods;quarterly: goods and container transport by nationality of vessels. In addition, the legislation foresees voluntary annual data on vessel traffic. Voluntary annual data on the transport of dangerous goods and the number of accidents has been agreed with the reporting countries.   Summarising, Eurostat collects the following statistics on inland waterway transport:Transport of goods (annual and quarterly mandatory data provision);Vessel traffic (annual voluntary data provision);Transport of dangerous goods (annual voluntary data provision)Number of accidents (annual voluntary data provision).   An exhaustive survey is conducted by all reporting countries for national IWW transport statistics. For international IWW transport statistics, all but one country undertake an exhaustive survey. The exception, Poland, relies on assistance from the German statistical authorities to estimate international traffic, undertaken by non-Polish units. For the transit inland waterway transport, many countries conduct an exhaustive survey while few use sampling techniques to estimate it. Others rely on cooperation with neighbouring countries to provide the necessary information. Data are collected and/or compiled by the competent national authorities, which can be either the National Statistical Office or the ministries responsible. Original data sources are the inland waterways transport undertakings but the actual data providers are mainly national administrative authorities, national port authorities or IWW operators. In addition, RIS (River Information System) is used as data sources in several countries. Â
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 27 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Inland waterway transport statistics provides information on the volume and performance of freight transport on EU inland waterway network. They are reported on the basis of the "territoriality principle" which means that each country reports the loading, unloading and movements of goods that take place on its national territory, irrespective of country of origins of undertakings or place of first loading and final unloading.   The full data provision obligation includes: annually: goods transport by type of goods, by nationality of vessels and by type of vessel as well as container transport by type of goods;quarterly: goods and container transport by nationality of vessels. In addition, the legislation foresees voluntary annual data on vessel traffic. Voluntary annual data on the transport of dangerous goods and the number of accidents has been agreed with the reporting countries.   Summarising, Eurostat collects the following statistics on inland waterway transport: Transport of goods (annual and quarterly mandatory data provision);Vessel traffic (annual voluntary data provision);Transport of dangerous goods (annual voluntary data provision)Number of accidents (annual voluntary data provision). An exhaustive survey is conducted by all reporting countries for national IWW transport statistics. For international IWW transport statistics, all but one country undertake an exhaustive survey. The exception, Poland, relies on assistance from the German statistical authorities to estimate international traffic, undertaken by non-Polish units. For the transit inland waterway transport, many countries conduct an exhaustive survey while few use sampling techniques to estimate it. Others rely on cooperation with neighbouring countries to provide the necessary information. Data are collected and/or compiled by the competent national authorities, which can be either the National Statistical Office or the ministries responsible. Original data sources are the inland waterways transport undertakings but the actual data providers are mainly national administrative authorities, national port authorities or IWW operators. In addition, RIS (River Information System) is used as data sources in several countries.

Nossa declaração de privacidade e política de cookies

O nosso website utiliza cookies para facilitar a sua experiência online. Eles foram salvos no seu computador quando você lançou este site. Você pode modificar suas configurações pessoais para cookies através das configurações do seu navegador de Internet.

Política de Privacidade