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Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

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    • junho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • setembro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards. SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat's website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values.
    • outubro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 10 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 10 outubro, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • agosto 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • janeiro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 05 fevereiro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • janeiro 2015
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • janeiro 2015
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • junho 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards. SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat's website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values.
    • outubro 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • agosto 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • janeiro 2015
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • fevereiro 2012
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • julho 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 04 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • setembro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • julho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • julho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • julho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • julho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • B
    • junho 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • abril 2015
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • setembro 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 18 junho, 2019
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • agosto 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 agosto, 2017
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      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 junho, 2019
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      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 07 julho, 2019
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    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 26 novembro, 2019
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      The annual Business demography data collection covers variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not considered. The data are drawn from business registers, although some countries improve the availability of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. Currently, business demography delivers key information for policy decision-making and for the indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows:Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The complete list of the basic variables, delivered from the data providers (National Statistical Institutes) and the derived indicators, calculated by Eurostat, is attached in the Annexes of this document (see Business demography indicators).  Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises. The methodology laid down in the Eurostat-OECD Manual on Business Demography Statistics  is followed closely by most of the countries (see Country specific notes in the Annexes).
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 30 novembro, 2019
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      Data on cultural enterprises come from 2 data collections and are summarised in 4 Tables : a) SBS (Structural Business Statistics) Table 1. Number and average size of enterprises in the cultural sectors by NACE Rev. 2 activity (cult_ent_num) Table 2. Value added and turnover of enterprises in the cultural sectors by NACE Rev. 2 activity (cult_ent_val), in millions of EUR and as a percentage of services except trade and financial and insurance activities (i.e. NACE Rev. 2 sections H to N, without K) Table 3. Services by employment size class (NACE Rev. 2, H-N, S95) (sbs_sc_1b_se_r2)   b) Business Demography (BD) Table 4. Business demography by size class (from 2004 onwards, NACE Rev. 2) (bd_9bd_sz_cl_r2)   The data focus on culture-related sectors of activity, as identified by international experts in the final report of the European Statistical System Network on Culture (ESS-Net Culture Report 2012).   The cultural sphere in business statistics is therefore captured through the following NACE Rev. 2 codes, when they are covered (see 3.3. Sector coverage for details): J58.11 Book publishing J58.13 Publishing of newspapers J58.14 Publishing of journals and periodicals J58.21 Publishing of computer games J59 Motion picture, video and television programme production, sound recording and music publishing activities J60 Programming and broadcasting activities J63.91 News agency activities M71.11 Architectural activities M74.1 Specialised design activities R90 Creative, arts and entertainment activities R91 Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural activities
    • agosto 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 08 agosto, 2017
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      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • agosto 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 18 agosto, 2019
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    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2019
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      The annual Business demography data collection covers variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not considered. The data are drawn from business registers, although some countries improve the availability of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. Currently, business demography delivers key information for policy decision-making and for the indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows:Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The complete list of the basic variables, delivered from the data providers (National Statistical Institutes) and the derived indicators, calculated by Eurostat, is attached in the Annexes of this document.  Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises. The methodology laid down in the Eurostat-OECD Manual on Business Demography Statistics  is followed closely by most of the countries (see Country specific notes in the Annexes).
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The annual Business demography data collection covers variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not considered. The data are drawn from business registers, although some countries improve the availability of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. Currently, business demography delivers key information for policy decision-making and for the indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows:Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The complete list of the basic variables, delivered from the data providers (National Statistical Institutes) and the derived indicators, calculated by Eurostat, is attached in the Annexes of this document.  Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises. The methodology laid down in the Eurostat-OECD Manual on Business Demography Statistics  is followed closely by most of the countries (see Country specific notes in the Annexes).
    • novembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • novembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • abril 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 março, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • abril 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 14 novembro, 2017
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      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 novembro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • C
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 março, 2019
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:cpc_insbs  The focus of this domain is on the following country groups:Acceeding country: Croatia (HR)Candidate countries: the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MK), Montenegro (ME), Iceland (IS), Serbia (RS) and Turkey (TR)Potential candidate countries: Albania (AL), Bosnia and Herzegovina (BA), as well as Kosovo under UNSCR 1244/99 (XK)
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 março, 2019
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      The focus of this domain is on enlargement countries, in other words the following country groups: candidate countries — Albania (AL), the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MK), Montenegro (ME), Iceland (IS), Serbia (RS) and Turkey (TR)potential candidates — Bosnia and Herzegovina (BA), as well as Kosovo (XK) (*) An extensive range of indicators is presented in this domain, including indicators from almost every theme covered by European statistics. Only annual data are published in this domain. (*) This designation is without prejudice to positions on status and is in line with UNSCR 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence.
    • março 2015
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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      The data in this dataset comes from the Common Questionnaire for Transport Statistics, developed and surveyed in co-operation between the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the International Transport Forum (ITF) and Eurostat. The Common Questionnaire is not supported by a legal act, but is based on a gentlemen's agreement with the participating countries; the completeness varies from country to country. Eurostat’s datasets based on the Common Questionnaire cover annual data for the EU Member States, EFTA states and Candidate countries to the EU. Data for other participating countries are available through the ITF and the UNECE. In total, comparable transport data collected through the Common Questionnaire is available for close to 60 countries worldwide. The Common Questionnaire collects aggregated annual data on: Railway transportRoad transportInland waterways transportOil pipelines transportGas pipelines transport For each mode of transport, the Common Questionnaire cover some or all of the following sub-modules (the number of questions/variables within each sub-module varies between the different modes of transport): Infrastructure (All modes)Transport equipment (RAIL, ROAD and INLAND WATERWAYS)Enterprises, economic performance and employment (All modes)Traffic (RAIL, ROAD and INLAND WATERWAYS)Transport measurement (All modes) Accidents (ROAD only) The Common Questionnaire is completed by the competent national authorities. The responsibility for completing specific modules (e.g. Transport by Rail) or part of modules (e.g. Road Infrastructure) may be delegated to other national authorities in charge of specific fields.
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 novembro, 2017
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      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 novembro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
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      Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • dezembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 07 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Industry, Trade and Services statistics are part of Short-term statistics (STS), they give information on a wide range of economic activities according to NACE Rev.2 classification (Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community). The industrial import price indices offer information according to the CPA classification(Statistical Classification of Products by Activity in the European Economic Community). Construction indices are broken down by Classification of Types of Construction (CC). All data under this heading are index data. Percentage changes are also available for each indicator. The index data are presented in the following forms:UnadjustedCalendar adjustedSeasonally-adjusted Depending on the STS regulation, data are accessible monthly and quarterly. This heading covers the indicators listed below in four different sectors. Based on the national data, Eurostat compiles EU and euro area infra-annual economic statistics. Among these, a list of indicators, called Principal European Economic Indicators (PEEIs) has been identified by key users as being of prime importance for the conduct of monetary and economic policy of the euro area. These indicators are mainly released through Eurostat's website under the heading Euro-indicators. There are eight PEEIs contributed by STS and they are marked with * in the text below. INDUSTRYProduction Index*Turnover IndexProducer Prices (Domestic Output Prices index)*Import Prices Index*: Total, Euro area market, Non euro area market (euro area countries only)Labour Input Indicators: Number of Persons Employed, Hours Worked, Gross Wages and Salaries CONSTRUCTIONProduction Index*: Total of the construction sector, Building construction, Civil EngineeringLabour input indicators: Number of Persons Employed, Hours Worked, Gross Wages and SalariesConstruction costs IndexBuilding permits indicators*: Number of dwellings WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADEVolume of sales (deflated turnover)*Turnover (in value)Labour input indicators: Number of Persons Employed SERVICES Turnover Index*Producer prices (Ouput prices)*
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsbu_q_r2 Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published: as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • dezembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 07 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Industry, Trade and Services statistics are part of Short-term statistics (STS), they give information on a wide range of economic activities according to NACE Rev.2 classification (Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community). The industrial import price indices offer information according to the CPA classification(Statistical Classification of Products by Activity in the European Economic Community). Construction indices are broken down by Classification of Types of Construction (CC). All data under this heading are index data. Percentage changes are also available for each indicator. The index data are presented in the following forms: UnadjustedCalendar adjustedSeasonally-adjusted Depending on the STS regulation, data are accessible monthly and quarterly. This heading covers the indicators listed below in four different sectors. Based on the national data, Eurostat compiles EU and euro area infra-annual economic statistics. Among these, a list of indicators, called Principal European Economic Indicators (PEEIs) has been identified by key users as being of prime importance for the conduct of monetary and economic policy of the euro area. These indicators are mainly released through Eurostat's website under the heading Euro-indicators. There are eight PEEIs contributed by STS and they are marked with * in the text below. INDUSTRYProduction Index*Turnover IndexProducer Prices (Domestic Output Prices index)*Import Prices Index*: Total, Euro area market, Non euro area market (euro area countries only)Labour Input Indicators: Number of Persons Employed, Hours Worked, Gross Wages and SalariesCONSTRUCTIONProduction Index*: Total of the construction sector, Building construction, Civil EngineeringLabour input indicators: Number of Persons Employed, Hours Worked, Gross Wages and SalariesConstruction costs IndexBuilding permits indicators*: Number of dwellingsWHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADEVolume of sales (deflated turnover)*Turnover (in value)Labour input indicators: Number of Persons EmployedSERVICES  Turnover Index* Producer prices (Ouput prices)*
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsco_m Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsco_q Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published: as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • outubro 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • abril 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • abril 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 06 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • D
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Demand for services collection contains harmonised statistics on demand for services by enterprises in the non-financial business economy. The Demand for services collection includes the following variables: number of enterprises purchases of servicesservice related investments The demand side survey "demand for services" provides information on the functioning of the internal market for services, allowing a more profound understanding of the true extent of the use of services in the European economy. It provides information on service providers, types of service purchased, the location of the main service provider, barriers to purchasing services, the level of expectations for future purchases, as well as information on service related investments in intangibles (such as tradable rights, ICT, R&D, marketing and sales).
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society 2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT security and trust,access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • E
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 novembro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • dezembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 07 dezembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data on European cities were collected in the Urban Audit and in the Large City Audit project. The projects' ultimate goal is to contribute towards the improvement of the quality of urban life: it supports the exchange of experience among European cities; it helps to identify best practices; it facilitates benchmarking at the European level and provides information on the dynamics within the cities and with their surroundings. At the city level, the Urban Audit contains 171 variables and 62 indicators. These indicators are derived from the variables collected by the European Statistical System. The data is published in 20 tables within 2 main groups, plus a perception survey table: Cities and greater cities (urb_cgc) Population on 1 January by age groups and sex - cities and greater cities (urb_cpop1) Population structure - cities and greater cities (urb_cpopstr) Population by citizenship and country of birth - cities and greater cities (urb_cpopcb) Fertility and mortality - cities and greater cities (urb_cfermor) Living conditions - cities and greater cities (urb_clivcon) Education - cities and greater cities (urb_ceduc) Culture and tourism - cities and greater cities (urb_ctour) Labour market - cities and greater cities (urb_clma) Economy and finance - cities and greater cities (urb_cecfi) Transport - cities and greater cities (urb_ctran) Environment - cities and greater cities (urb_cenv) Functional Urban Area (urb_luz) Population on 1 January by age groups and sex - Functional Urban Area (urb_lpop1)Population structure - Functional Urban Area (urb_lpopstr)Population by citizenship and country of birth - Functional Urban Area (urb_lpopcb) Fertility and mortality - Functional Urban Area (urb_lfermor)Living conditions - Functional Urban Area (urb_llivcon)Education - Functional Urban Area (urb_leduc) Labour market - Functional Urban Area (urb_llmma) Transport - Functional Urban Area (urb_ltran) Environment - Functional Urban Area (urb_lenv)Perception survey results (urb_percep) Data has been collected on four spatial levels in the Urban Audit: The City (C) according to the administrative definition, as the basic level,The Functional Urban Area (FUA) being an approximation of the functional urban zone centered around the city, andIn some cases, the urban centre stretches far beyond its boundaries. To better capture the entire urban centre, a 'greater city' level (K), has been created. This level was created for some capitals and several other large cities.The Sub-City District (SCD) being a subdivision of the city according to population criteria.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 09 julho, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 21 outubro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The annual Business demography data collection covers variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not considered. The data are drawn from business registers, although some countries improve the availability of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. Currently, business demography delivers key information for policy decision-making and for the indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows:Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The complete list of the basic variables, delivered from the data providers (National Statistical Institutes) and the derived indicators, calculated by Eurostat, is attached in the Annexes of this document (see Business demography indicators).  Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises. The methodology laid down in the Eurostat-OECD Manual on Business Demography Statistics  is followed closely by most of the countries (see Country specific notes in the Annexes).
    • agosto 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 agosto, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • agosto 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 21 agosto, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/background - Other typologies (urt) includes data by urban-rural typology, coastal typology, border/non-border regions, island/non-island typology and mountain/non-mountain regions    For details see https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/regions-and-cities - Tourism statistics by coastal areas (mare)    For details see https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/coastal-island-outermost-regions/methodology
    • outubro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 21 outubro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:bd_9fh_sz_cl_r2 The data category covers a group of variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not included in this data. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows:Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The data are drawn from business registers, although some individual countries improve the availability or freshness of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises.
    • agosto 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 08 agosto, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/background - Other typologies (urt) includes data by urban-rural typology, coastal typology, border/non-border regions, island/non-island typology and mountain/non-mountain regions    For details see https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/regions-and-cities - Tourism statistics by coastal areas (mare)    For details see https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/coastal-island-outermost-regions/methodology
    • agosto 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 agosto, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • junho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • fevereiro 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 17 fevereiro, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • janeiro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 19 fevereiro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The focus of this domain is on the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) countries in Eastern Europe, namely Armenia (AM), Azerbaijan (AZ), Belarus (BY), Georgia (GE), Moldova (MD) and Ukraine (UA). An extensive range of indicators is presented in this domain, including indicators from almost every theme covered by European statistics. Only annual data are published in this domain.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 maio, 2016
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 agosto, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society 2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT security and trust,access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • junho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent07s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent06s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 18 junho, 2019
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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    • fevereiro 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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    • fevereiro 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 25 março, 2016
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    • dezembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent15n There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent15s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
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      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 maio, 2019
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 março, 2019
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 03 abril, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This is a one-off survey, not intended to be repeated.  Access to finance is crucial to business success and an important factor for economic growth in Europe following the economic crisis in 2007. The purpose of the survey is to:Examine where there may be constraints on the availability of finance, and how those may be changing.Provide evidence on the need for finance (loans, equity and other) in the future, for example to promote growth.Identify the sources from which businesses would wish to obtain this finance.  It is important to be able to compare businesses that have shown sharp growth in recent years with those that have not; and to separate more recently formed businesses from others. As a consequence, the survey will collect information separately for "gazelles" (defined at page 3 below); other high-growth businesses that have been established longer than gazelles; and other businesses. Only businesses with an employment of 10-249 in 2005 and at least 10 employees in 2010 are being covered.
    • março 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 03 abril, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This is a one-off survey, not intended to be repeated.  Access to finance is crucial to business success and an important factor for economic growth in Europe following the economic crisis in 2007. The purpose of the survey is to:Examine where there may be constraints on the availability of finance, and how those may be changing.Provide evidence on the need for finance (loans, equity and other) in the future, for example to promote growth.Identify the sources from which businesses would wish to obtain this finance.  It is important to be able to compare businesses that have shown sharp growth in recent years with those that have not; and to separate more recently formed businesses from others. As a consequence, the survey will collect information separately for "gazelles" (defined at page 3 below); other high-growth businesses that have been established longer than gazelles; and other businesses. Only businesses with an employment of 10-249 in 2005 and at least 10 employees in 2010 are being covered.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • outubro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent03bs There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • outubro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • julho 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • julho 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent25 There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent23 There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent24 There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • julho 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • junho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 27 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • junho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 27 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 julho, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 julho, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent21 There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent08as There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 agosto, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Applications to see open job positions, request annual leave, view or download payslips, or other services. In January of the survey year.
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 agosto, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 26 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 agosto, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 agosto, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • julho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 agosto, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • junho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • setembro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • setembro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • setembro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • setembro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 dezembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • junho 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 27 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent12n There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent12s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent13n There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent13s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent09s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent14s There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent14n There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) collects information on enterprises’ investment in the continuing vocational training of their staff. Continuing vocational training (CVT) refers to education or training measures or activities which are financed in total or at least partly by the enterprise (directly or indirectly). Part financing could include the use of work-time for the training activity as well as financing of training equipment. Information available from the CVTS is grouped around the following topics: Training/non-training enterprisesParticipation in continuing vocational trainingPlanning and assessment of continuing vocational trainingCosts of continuing vocational training coursesTime spent on continuing vocational training courses Four waves of the CVTS have been carried out by now: CVTS 1 – reference year 1993CVTS 2 – reference year 1999CVTS 3 – reference year 2005CVTS 4 – reference year 2010 The domain "Vocational training in enterprises (trng_cvts)" presents data for 2010 and 2005 which are comparable between the two waves. 2005 data which are not comparable with 2010 data are shown in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 2005 (trng_cvts3)" and 1999 data are available in the folder "Continuing vocational training - reference year 1999 (trng_cvts2)". Both folders can be found in the domain "Past series (trng_h)". The first survey (CVTS 1) was carried out in the then 12 Member States of the European Union. CVTS 1 was of pioneering nature and due to lack of comparability with the following waves data are not available in Eurostat's online database but main results are available here. The next CVTS is due for reference year 2015.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 junho, 2014
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:trng_ent20n There are three main sources providing results on participation in education and training. - The Adult Education Survey (AES) is carried out every 5 years starting from 2011 and is designed to give detailed information on the participation of individuals in education and training activities. A pilot survey took place in 2007. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the twelve months prior to the interview. - The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides annual evolutions for a limited set of indicators. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. - The Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS) completes the AES results each 5 years focussing on enterprise strategies for employee skill developments. The reference period for the participation in education and training activities is the four weeks prior to the interview. The time series for the indicator 'lifelong learning' (participation of adults aged 25-64 in education and training) is based on the EU-LFS (four-week reference period) which is, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator, including the following: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series, - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) In addition to these series, an ad-hoc module to the LFS was conducted in 2003 on lifelong leaninng with similar characteristics to the AES (12-month reference period). Life-long learning is also part of the Sustainable Development Indicators.
    • dezembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • setembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This is a one-off survey, not intended to be repeated.  Access to finance is crucial to business success and an important factor for economic growth in Europe following the economic crisis in 2007. The purpose of the survey is to:Examine where there may be constraints on the availability of finance, and how those may be changing.Provide evidence on the need for finance (loans, equity and other) in the future, for example to promote growth.Identify the sources from which businesses would wish to obtain this finance.  It is important to be able to compare businesses that have shown sharp growth in recent years with those that have not; and to separate more recently formed businesses from others. As a consequence, the survey will collect information separately for "gazelles" (defined at page 3 below); other high-growth businesses that have been established longer than gazelles; and other businesses. Only businesses with an employment of 10-249 in 2005 and at least 10 employees in 2010 are being covered.
    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • maio 2012
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Scoreboard has been prepared from companies' annual reports and accounts received by an independent data provider.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsci_m_r2 Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published: as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Demand for services collection contains harmonised statistics on demand for services by enterprises in the non-financial business economy. The Demand for services collection includes the following variables: number of enterprises purchases of servicesservice related investments The demand side survey "demand for services" provides information on the functioning of the internal market for services, allowing a more profound understanding of the true extent of the use of services in the European economy. It provides information on service providers, types of service purchased, the location of the main service provider, barriers to purchasing services, the level of expectations for future purchases, as well as information on service related investments in intangibles (such as tradable rights, ICT, R&D, marketing and sales).
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This ad hoc survey was conducted in interested Member States in order to test the feasibility of qualitative surveys in enterprises on topics of varying description. This survey was on the extent, scope, nature and trends of relationships between enterprises, so called inter-enterprise relationships (IER). A task force met several times to set the methodology for the survey and to agree on the coverage of 21 distinct NACE areas, in part aggregating NACE Rev. 1.1 classes, groups and divisions. Variables are to be understood for the purpose of the project as qualitative questions on the subject area of the survey. The samples were drawn in participating countries from the SBS survey frame, with sample sizes up to 10.000 enterprises. Other than the NACE breakdown, a breakdown by employment size classes was applied. While some variables (questions) allowed the selection from a predefined list, others were left to the respondents' judgment as to "very important", "important", "less important" etc.
  • F
    • setembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This is a one-off survey, not intended to be repeated.  Access to finance is crucial to business success and an important factor for economic growth in Europe following the economic crisis in 2007. The purpose of the survey is to:Examine where there may be constraints on the availability of finance, and how those may be changing.Provide evidence on the need for finance (loans, equity and other) in the future, for example to promote growth.Identify the sources from which businesses would wish to obtain this finance.  It is important to be able to compare businesses that have shown sharp growth in recent years with those that have not; and to separate more recently formed businesses from others. As a consequence, the survey will collect information separately for "gazelles" (defined at page 3 below); other high-growth businesses that have been established longer than gazelles; and other businesses. Only businesses with an employment of 10-249 in 2005 and at least 10 employees in 2010 are being covered.
    • setembro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This is a one-off survey, not intended to be repeated.  Access to finance is crucial to business success and an important factor for economic growth in Europe following the economic crisis in 2007. The purpose of the survey is to:Examine where there may be constraints on the availability of finance, and how those may be changing.Provide evidence on the need for finance (loans, equity and other) in the future, for example to promote growth.Identify the sources from which businesses would wish to obtain this finance.  It is important to be able to compare businesses that have shown sharp growth in recent years with those that have not; and to separate more recently formed businesses from others. As a consequence, the survey will collect information separately for "gazelles" (defined at page 3 below); other high-growth businesses that have been established longer than gazelles; and other businesses. Only businesses with an employment of 10-249 in 2005 and at least 10 employees in 2010 are being covered.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsfs_m Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published: as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • janeiro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 21 fevereiro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • janeiro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 fevereiro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • G
    • novembro 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • julho 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 14 julho, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • H
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 25 novembro, 2019
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      The annual Business demography data collection covers variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not considered. The data are drawn from business registers, although some countries improve the availability of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. Currently, business demography delivers key information for policy decision-making and for the indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows: Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The complete list of the basic variables, delivered from the data providers (National Statistical Institutes) and the derived indicators, calculated by Eurostat, is attached in the Annexes of this document.  Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises. The methodology laid down in the Eurostat-OECD Manual on Business Demography Statistics  is followed closely by most of the countries (see Country specific notes in the Annexes).
  • I
    • fevereiro 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This ad hoc survey was conducted in interested Member States in order to test the feasibility of qualitative surveys in enterprises on topics of varying description. This survey was on the extent, scope, nature and trends of relationships between enterprises, so called inter-enterprise relationships (IER). A task force met several times to set the methodology for the survey and to agree on the coverage of 21 distinct NACE areas, in part aggregating NACE Rev. 1.1 classes, groups and divisions. Variables are to be understood for the purpose of the project as qualitative questions on the subject area of the survey. The samples were drawn in participating countries from the SBS survey frame, with sample sizes up to 10.000 enterprises. Other than the NACE breakdown, a breakdown by employment size classes was applied. While some variables (questions) allowed the selection from a predefined list, others were left to the respondents' judgment as to "very important", "important", "less important" etc.
    • janeiro 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 janeiro, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The annual Business demography data collection covers variables which explain the characteristics and demography of the business population. The methodology allows for the production of data on enterprise births (and deaths), that is, enterprise creations (cessations) that amount to the creation (dissolution) of a combination of production factors and where no other enterprises are involved. In other words, enterprises created or closed solely as a result of e.g. restructuring, merger or break-up are not considered. The data are drawn from business registers, although some countries improve the availability of data on employment and turnover by integrating other sources. Until 2010 reference year the harmonised data collection is carried out to satisfy the requirements for the Structural Indicators, used for monitoring progress of the Lisbon process, regarding business births, deaths and survival. Currently, business demography delivers key information for policy decision-making and for the indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. It also provides key data for the joint OECD-Eurostat "Entrepreneurship Indicators Programme". In summary, the collected indicators are as follows: Population of active enterprisesNumber of enterprise birthsNumber of enterprise survivals up to five yearsNumber of enterprise deathsRelated variables on employmentDerived indicators such as birth rates, death rates, survival rates and employment sharesAn additional set of indicators on high-growth enterprises and 'gazelles' (high-growth enterprises that are up to five years old) The complete list of the basic variables, delivered from the data providers (National Statistical Institutes) and the derived indicators, calculated by Eurostat, is attached in the Annexes of this document (see Business demography indicators).  Geographically EU Member States and EFTA countries are covered. In practice not all Member States have participated in the first harmonised data collection exercises. The methodology laid down in the Eurostat-OECD Manual on Business Demography Statistics  is followed closely by most of the countries (see Country specific notes in the Annexes).
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsin_m_r2 Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 04 dezembro, 2019
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      Industry, Trade and Services statistics are part of Short-term statistics (STS), they give information on a wide range of economic activities according to NACE Rev.2 classification (Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community). The industrial import price indices offer information according to the CPA classification(Statistical Classification of Products by Activity in the European Economic Community). Construction indices are broken down by Classification of Types of Construction (CC). All data under this heading are index data. Percentage changes are also available for each indicator. The index data are presented in the following forms:UnadjustedCalendar adjustedSeasonally-adjusted Depending on the STS regulation, data are accessible monthly and quarterly. This heading covers the indicators listed below in four different sectors. Based on the national data, Eurostat compiles EU and euro area infra-annual economic statistics. Among these, a list of indicators, called Principal European Economic Indicators (PEEIs) has been identified by key users as being of prime importance for the conduct of monetary and economic policy of the euro area. These indicators are mainly released through Eurostat's website under the heading Euro-indicators. There are eight PEEIs contributed by STS and they are marked with * in the text below. INDUSTRYProduction Index*Turnover IndexProducer Prices (Domestic Output Prices index)*Import Prices Index*: Total, Euro area market, Non euro area market (euro area countries only)Labour Input Indicators: Number of Persons Employed, Hours Worked, Gross Wages and Salaries CONSTRUCTIONProduction Index*: Total of the construction sector, Building construction, Civil EngineeringLabour input indicators: Number of Persons Employed, Hours Worked, Gross Wages and SalariesConstruction costs IndexBuilding permits indicators*: Number of dwellings WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADEVolume of sales (deflated turnover)*Turnover (in value)Labour input indicators: Number of Persons Employed SERVICES Turnover Index*Producer prices (Ouput prices)*
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsin_q_r2 Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • janeiro 2011
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 15 agosto, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsin_q_bc Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • novembro 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 dezembro, 2019
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:sbs_sc_ind_r2 SBS covers the Nace Rev.2 Section B to N and division S95 which are organized in four annexes, covering Industry (sections B-E), Construction (F), Trade (G) and Services (H, I, J, L, M, N and S95). Financial services are covered in three specific annexes and separate metadata files have been compiled. Up to reference year 2007 data was presented using the NACE Rev.1.1 classification. The SBS coverage was limited to NACE Rev.1.1 Sections C to K. Starting from the reference year 2008 data is available in NACE Rev.2. Double reported data in NACE Rev.1.1 for the reference year 2008 will be available in the first and second quarter of 2011. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables               - labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked)               - goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases)               - capital input (e.g. Material investments) Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4 digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' in NACE Rev 1.1 sections H, I, K have been aggregated. Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available. Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009.  For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by N°1614/2002 and N°1669/2003. SBS data are collected primarily by National Statistical Institutes (NSI). Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provides the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE  Rev 1.1 Section J). 
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 17 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • outubro 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 03 novembro, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 03 novembro, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 22 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 27 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society 2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT security and trust,access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity),use of Big data analysis,use of 3D printing,use of robotics.Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      This ad hoc survey was conducted in interested Member States in order to test the feasibility of qualitative surveys in enterprises on topics of varying description. This survey was on the extent, scope, nature and trends of relationships between enterprises, so called inter-enterprise relationships (IER). A task force met several times to set the methodology for the survey and to agree on the coverage of 21 distinct NACE areas, in part aggregating NACE Rev. 1.1 classes, groups and divisions. Variables are to be understood for the purpose of the project as qualitative questions on the subject area of the survey. The samples were drawn in participating countries from the SBS survey frame, with sample sizes up to 10.000 enterprises. Other than the NACE breakdown, a breakdown by employment size classes was applied. While some variables (questions) allowed the selection from a predefined list, others were left to the respondents' judgment as to "very important", "important", "less important" etc.
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 novembro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • outubro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 novembro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society 2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT security and trust,access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 23 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
  • J
  • K
  • L
    • março 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 12 março, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The level of citizens confidence in EU institutions (Council of the European Union, European Parliament and European Commission) is expressed as the share of positive opinions (people who declare that they tend to trust) about the institutions. The indicator is based on the Eurobarometer, a survey which has been conducted twice a year since 1973 to monitor the evolution of public opinion in the Member States. The indicator only displays the results of the autumn survey. Potential replies to the question on the level of confidence include 'tend to trust', 'tend not to trust' and 'don't know' or 'no answer'. Trust is not precisely defined and could leave some room for interpretation to the interviewees.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Demand for services collection contains harmonised statistics on demand for services by enterprises in the non-financial business economy. The Demand for services collection includes the following variables: number of enterprises purchases of servicesservice related investments The demand side survey "demand for services" provides information on the functioning of the internal market for services, allowing a more profound understanding of the true extent of the use of services in the European economy. It provides information on service providers, types of service purchased, the location of the main service provider, barriers to purchasing services, the level of expectations for future purchases, as well as information on service related investments in intangibles (such as tradable rights, ICT, R&D, marketing and sales).
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • M
    • junho 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The “Business services statistics” (BS) collection contains harmonised statistics on business services. BS is a driver of the knowledge-based economy and their labour-intensive nature has attracted interest in their potential as providers of new jobs in the future. Contributing to the recent increase in the demand for business services, the growing trend in outsourcing has seen many enterprises use service providers for non-core professional activities. Technological progress and the Internet are also important factors which have provided new production possibilities and new modes of supply. Due to its growing importance, BS data are collected since 2000 reference year. The data were collected under Gentlemen agreement until 2007 reference year and from 2008 onwards it become part of the regular mandatory annual data collection of SBS. The BS’s data requirements before 2008 reference year included more variables, but data is available only for a small number of countries. The following variables are available until 2007 reference year: Number of enterprisesTurnover or gross premiums writtenValue added at factor costPersonnel costsNumber of persons employedNumber of employeesNumber of part-time employees The “Turnover or gross premiums written” variable is broken down by product and residence of client. In addition, there is information on the turnover shares of product and client specialised enterprises. The statistics on “Turnover by product” permits analyses on each product's relative importance in the turnover, consistency of product level statistics and product specialisation. On the other hand, information on “Turnover by client” enables analyses on type and location of client and client specialisation. The economic variables make it possible to extend the analysis to productivity and personnel cost issues. From 2008 onwards, the BS’s data requirements are only for variable “Turnover” broken down by products and by type of residence of client. The majority of the data is collected annually by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources.
    • julho 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 junho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The “Business services statistics” (BS) collection contains harmonised statistics on business services. BS is a driver of the knowledge-based economy and their labour-intensive nature has attracted interest in their potential as providers of new jobs in the future. Contributing to the recent increase in the demand for business services, the growing trend in outsourcing has seen many enterprises use service providers for non-core professional activities. Technological progress and the Internet are also important factors which have provided new production possibilities and new modes of supply. Due to its growing importance, BS data are collected since 2000 reference year. The data were collected under Gentlemen agreement until 2007 reference year and from 2008 onwards it become part of the regular mandatory annual data collection of SBS. The BS’s data requirements before 2008 reference year included more variables, but data is available only for a small number of countries. The following variables are available until 2007 reference year: Number of enterprisesTurnover or gross premiums writtenValue added at factor costPersonnel costsNumber of persons employedNumber of employeesNumber of part-time employees The “Turnover or gross premiums written” variable is broken down by product and residence of client. In addition, there is information on the turnover shares of product and client specialised enterprises. The statistics on “Turnover by product” permits analyses on each product's relative importance in the turnover, consistency of product level statistics and product specialisation. On the other hand, information on “Turnover by client” enables analyses on type and location of client and client specialisation. The economic variables make it possible to extend the analysis to productivity and personnel cost issues. From 2008 onwards, the BS’s data requirements are only for variable “Turnover” broken down by products and by type of residence of client. The majority of the data is collected annually by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Demand for services collection contains harmonised statistics on demand for services by enterprises in the non-financial business economy. The Demand for services collection includes the following variables: number of enterprises purchases of servicesservice related investments The demand side survey "demand for services" provides information on the functioning of the internal market for services, allowing a more profound understanding of the true extent of the use of services in the European economy. It provides information on service providers, types of service purchased, the location of the main service provider, barriers to purchasing services, the level of expectations for future purchases, as well as information on service related investments in intangibles (such as tradable rights, ICT, R&D, marketing and sales).
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • março 2009
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • janeiro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 05 fevereiro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • janeiro 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 05 fevereiro, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • junho 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 junho, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The source for the regional labour market information down to NUTS level 2 is the EU Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS). This is a quarterly household sample survey conducted in all Member States of the EU and in EFTA and Candidate countries.  The EU-LFS survey follows the definitions and recommendations of the International Labour Organisation (ILO). To achieve further harmonisation, the Member States also adhere to common principles when formulating questionnaires. The LFS' target population is made up of all persons in private households aged 15 and over. For more information see the EU Labour Force Survey (lfsi_esms, see paragraph 21.1.).  The EU-LFS is designed to give accurate quarterly information at national level as well as annual information at NUTS 2 regional level and the compilation of these figures is well specified in the regulation. Microdata including the NUTS 2 level codes are provided by all the participating countries with a good degree of geographical comparability, which allows the production and dissemination of a complete set of comparable indicators for this territorial level. At present the transmission of the regional labour market data at NUTS 3 level has no legal basis. However many countries transmit NUTS 3 figures to Eurostat on a voluntary basis, under the understanding that they are not for publication with such detail, but for aggregation in few categories per country, i.e., metropolitan regions and urban-rural typology. Most of the NUTS 3 data are based on the LFS while some countries transmit data based on registers, administrative data, small area estimation and other reliable sources.
    • setembro 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • julho 2017
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 14 julho, 2017
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 09 julho, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • maio 2016
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 maio, 2016
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below:Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • agosto 2014
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • setembro 2013
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • novembro 2010
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 28 novembro, 2015
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has i