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México

  • Presidente:Andrés Manuel López Obrador
  • Presidente do Senado:Martí Batres Guadarrama
  • Capital:Mexico City (Distrito Federal)
  • Línguas:Spanish only 92.7%, Spanish and indigenous languages 5.7%, indigenous only 0.8%, unspecified 0.8% note: indigenous languages include various Mayan, Nahuatl, and other regional languages (2005)
  • Governo
  • Estatísticas Nacionais Oficias
  • População, pessoas:126.190.788 (2018)
  • Área, km2:1.943.950
  • PIB per capita, US$:9.698 (2018)
  • PIB, bilhões em US$ atuais:1.223,8 (2018)
  • Índice de GINI:No data
  • Facilidade para Fazer Negócios:54

Income Distribution

Todos os conjuntos de dados:  A I P R T
  • A
    • junho 2013
      Fonte: World Bank
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 21 novembro, 2014
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      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: All The Ginis Dataset Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/all-ginis-dataset License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   This dataset includes combined and standardized Gini data from eight original sources: Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), Socio-Economic Database for Latin America (SEDLAC), Survey of Living Conditions (SILC) by Eurostat, World Income Distribution (WYD; the full data set is available here), World Bank Europe and Central Asia dataset, World Institute for Development Research (WIDER), World Bank Povcal, and Ginis from individual long-term inequality studies (just introduced in this version).
  • I
  • P
    • março 2019
      Fonte: World Bank
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 25 abril, 2019
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      The World Bank periodically prepares poverty assessments of countries in which it has an active program, in close collaboration with national institutions, other development agencies, and civil society, including poor people's organizations. Assessments report the extent and causes of poverty and propose strategies to reduce it. Countries have varying definitions of poverty, and comparisons can be difficult. National poverty lines tend to have higher purchasing power in rich countries, where standards used are more generous than in poor countries. Poverty measures based on an international poverty line attempt to hold the real value of the poverty line constant across countries, including when making comparisons over time. Data here includes measures of population living below the national poverty line as well as the international poverty line. Also included are income distributions and urban and rural poverty
  • R
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 02 julho, 2019
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      The Regional well-being dataset presents eleven dimensions central for well-being at local level and for 395 OECD regions, covering material conditions (income, jobs and housing), quality of life (education, health, environment, safety and access to services) and subjective well-being (social network support and life satisfaction). The set of indicators selected to measure these dimensions is a combination of people's individual attributes and their local conditions, and in most cases, are available over two different years (2000 and 2014). Regions can be easily visualised and compared to other regions through the interactive website [www.oecdregionalwellbeing.org]. The dataset, the website and the publications "Regions at a Glance" and "How’s life in your region?" are outputs designed from the framework for regional and local well-being. The Regional income distribution dataset presents comparable data on sub-national differences in income inequality and poverty for OECD countries. The data by region provide information on income distribution within regions (Gini coefficients and income quintiles), and relative income poverty (with poverty thresholds set in respect of the national population) for 2013. These new data complement international assessments of differences across regions in living conditions by documenting how household income is distributed within regions and how many people are poor relatively to the typical citizen of their country. For analytical purposes, the OECD classifies regions as the first administrative tier of sub-national government, so called Territorial Level 2 or TL2 in the OECD classification. This classification is used by National Statistical Offices to collect information and it represents in many countries the framework for implementing regional policies. Well-being indicators are shown for the 395 TL2 OECD regions, equivalent of the NUTS2 for European countries, with the exception for Estonian where well-being data are presented at a smaller (TL3) level and for the Regional Income dataset, where Greece, Hungary and Poland data are presented at a more aggregated (NUTS1) level.
  • T
    • junho 2018
      Fonte: World Inequality Database
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 08 junho, 2018
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      The World Inequality Report 2018 relies on a cutting-edge methodology to measure income and wealth inequality in a systematic and transparent manner. By developing this report, the World Inequality Lab seeks to fill a democratic gap and to equip various actors of society with the necessary facts to engage in informed public debates on inequality.   Table: MacroData: Which contains macro data series (aggregate and total income and wealth variables, as well as population variables and other macro indicator such as deflators, exchange rates, etc.) Inequality Data: Which contains inequality data series (income and wealth shares, thresholds, averages for different percentiles of the population).