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Alemanha

  • População, pessoas:82.927.922 (2018)
  • Área, km2:349.360
  • PIB per capita, US$:48.196 (2018)
  • PIB, bilhões em US$ atuais:3.996,8 (2018)
  • Índice de GINI:No data
  • Facilidade para Fazer Negócios:24

Material Resources

Todos os conjuntos de dados:  C D G M R U
  • C
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 18 março, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The circular material use rate (CMU) measures, in percentage, the degree of circular (secondary) materials in the economy in relation to the overall material use. A higher amount of secondary materials substituting for primary raw materials avoids extraction of primary material. The CMU is calculated as the ratio of the amount of secondary raw materials (U) to the overall material input for domestic use (DMC + U): CMU  =  U / (DMC + U) The amount of secondary raw materials (U) is approximated by the amount of waste treated in domestic recovery plants, minus imported waste destined for recovery, plus exported waste destined for recovery abroad. DMC is the domestic material consumption as defined in economy-wide material flow accounts. The CMU rate indicates the amount of domestically collected waste – destined for material recovery in domestic treatment plants as well as abroad – and fed back into the economy thus saving extraction of primary raw materials.
    • março 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 29 março, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Domestic material consumption (DMC) measures the total amount of materials directly used by an economy and is defined as the annual quantity of raw materials extracted from the domestic territory of the focal economy, plus all physical imports minus all physical exports. The indicator Domestic Material Consumption (DMC) is based on the Economy-wide Material Flow Accounts (EW-MFA). The theory of Economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA) includes compilations of the overall material inputs into national economy, the changes of material stock within the economy and the material outputs to other economies or to the environment. EW-MFA covers all solid, gaseous, and liquid materials, except water and air. Water included in products is included. The three main components of the DMC are:   - the raw materials domestically extracted (domestic extraction);   - the total import;   - the total export. It is important to note that the term "consumption" as used in DMC denotes apparent consumption and not final consumption. DMC does not include upstream hidden flows (materials that are extracted or moved, but do not enter the economy) related to imports and exports of raw materials and products. The indicator provides a basis for policies to decouple the growth of the economy from the use of natural resources so as to achieve a reduction of environment degradation resulting from primary production, material processing, manufacturing and waste disposal. DMC is a useful indicator, as it provides an assessment of the absolute level of use of resources and allows distinguishing consumption driven by domestic demand from consumption driven by the export market. Combined with GDP, it also provides insight into whether decoupling between the use of natural resources and growth of the economy is taking place.   The indicator is a Sustainable Development Indicator (SDI). It has been chosen for the assessment of the progress towards the objectives and targets of the EU Sustainable Development Strategy.   tsdpc220´s table: Eurobase > Tables by themes > Environment and energy > Environment > Environmental accounts > Components of domestic material consumption (tsdpc220) tsdpc220´s table within the SDI set: Eurobase > Tables on EU policy > Sustainable Development Indicators > Sustainable consumption and production > Resource use and waste > Components of domestic material consumption (tsdpc220)
  • D
  • G
  • M
    • março 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 19 março, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 09 julho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      The data presented come from two international sources: (1) UN and International Resource Panel "Global Material Flows Database" for non-EU OECD and non-OECD countries, and (2) Eurostat  "Material Flows and Resource Productivity" database for EU OECD countries. It should be born in mind that the data should be interpreted with caution and that the time series presented here may change in future as work on methodologies for MF accounting progresses. Furthermore, data contain rough estimates for OECD and BRIICS aggregates. These data refer to material resources, i.e. materials originating from natural resources that form the material basis of the economy: metals (ferrous, non-ferrous) non-metallic minerals (construction minerals, industrial minerals), biomass (wood, food) and fossil energy carriers. The use of materials in production and consumption processes has many economic, social and environmental consequences. These consequences often extend beyond the borders of countries or regions, notably when materials are traded internationally, either in the form of raw materials or as products embodying them. They differ among the various materials and among the various stages of the resource life cycle (extraction, processing, use, transport, end-of-life management). From an environmental point of view these consequences depend on:the rate of extraction and depletion of renewable and non-renewable resource stocksthe extent of harvest and the reproductive capacity and natural productivity of renewable resourcesthe associated environmental burden (e.g. pollution, waste, habitat disruption), and its effects on environmental quality (e.g. air, water, soil, biodiversity, landscape) and on related environmental services These data inform about physical flows of material resources at various levels of detail and at various stages of the flow chain. The information shows: a) the material basis of economies and its composition by major material groups, considering:the extraction of raw materials;the trade balance in physical terms;the consumption of materials;the material inputs b) the consumption of selected materials that are of environmental and economic significance. c) in-use stocks of selected products that are of environmental and economic significance. Domestic extraction used (DEU) refers to the flows of raw materials extracted or harvested from the environment and that physically enter the economic system for further processing or direct consumption (they are used by the economy as material factor inputs). Imports (IMP) and exports (EXP) are major components of the direct material flow indicators DMI (domestic material input) and DMC (domestic material consumption). They cannot be taken as indication of domestic resource requirements. Domestic material consumption (DMC) refers to the amount of materials directly used in an economy, which refers to the apparent consumption of materials. DMC is computed as DEU minus exports plus imports. Direct material input (DMI) is computed as DEU plus imports. The material groups are: Food: food crops (e.g. cereals, roots, sugar and oil bearing crops, fruits, vegetables), fodder crops (including grazing), wild animals (essentially marine catches), small amounts of non-edible biomass (e.g. fibres, rubber), and related products including livestock. Wood: harvested wood and traded products essentially made of wood (paper, furniture, etc.). Construction minerals: non-metallic construction minerals whether primary or processed. They comprise marble, granite, sandstone, porphyry, basalt, other ornamental or building stone (excluding slate); chalk and dolomite; sand and gravel; clays and kaolin; limestone and gypsum. Industrial minerals: non-metallic industrial minerals whether primary or processed (e.g. salts, arsenic, potash, phosphate rocks, sulphates, asbestos). Metals: metal ores, metals and products mainly made of metals. Fossil energy materials/carriers: coal, crude oil, natural gas and peat, as well as manufactured products predominantly made of fossil fuels (e.g. plastics, synthetic rubber).
  • R
    • julho 2019
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 03 julho, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Resource productivity is gross domestic product (GDP) divided by domestic material consumption (DMC). DMC measures the total amount of materials directly used by an economy. It is defined as the annual quantity of raw materials extracted from the domestic territory of the focal economy, plus all physical imports minus all physical exports. It is important to note that the term 'consumption', as used in DMC, denotes apparent consumption and not final consumption. DMC does not include upstream flows related to imports and exports of raw materials and products originating outside of the focal economy. For the calculation of resource productivity, Eurostat uses GDP either in unit 'EUR in chain-linked volumes' (to the reference year 2010 at 2010 exchange rates) or in unit 'PPS' (Purchasing Power Standard). Consequently, the indicator is expressed: i) in euro per kg, for comparing the changes in one country over time; ii) in PPS per kg, for comparing different countries in one specific year. It is also calculated as an index on year 2000, for comparing countries in different years. More information on resource productivity can be found in Statistics Explained.
    • março 2018
      Fonte: Eurostat
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 01 abril, 2018
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      20.1. Source data
  • U
    • dezembro 2018
      Fonte: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 24 abril, 2019
      Selecionar Conjunto de dados
      Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear power facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of baseload low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Although a valuable commodity, declining market prices for uranium in recent years, driven by uncertainties concerning the evolution in the use of nuclear power, have led to significant production cutbacks and the postponement of mine development plans in a number of countries and to some questions being raised about future uranium supply.

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