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By June 2015, the U.S. is home to more than 320 million inhabitants. The US population is diverse in ethnic and national lines. By June 2015, 77% of population are White people, 13.2% are African Americans, 5.5% are Asians, 1.25% are native Americans, less than 1% are native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander population, and 2.5% are two or more races. Population pyramid for races has different forms. For White Americans, African Americans and native Americans the structure looks like a pyramid with a stationary type of reproduction, where the shares of children and old age groups are almost balanced. For Asians the pyramid has a regressive type of reproduction, which is characterized by a relatively high share of elderly and old people and a modest share of children. And for two or more races population the pyramid is progressive or expanding, that is among people belonging to two or more races there is a high proportion of children and a low proportion of the older generation.

Source: United States National Population Estimates, 2015

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Download our latest US ECONOMY cheat sheet

The United States being the biggest economy in the world significantly influences the global economic situation. The US economy is comprehensively covered by data and statistics from multiple government and private sources. We selected the most significant and up-to-date ones and presented them in this cheat sheet.

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