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Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is a permanent, intergovernmental Organization, created at the Baghdad Conference on September 10–14, 1960, by Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. The five Founding Members were later joined by nine other Members: Qatar (1961); Indonesia (1962) – suspended its membership from January 2009-December 2015; Libya (1962); United Arab Emirates (1967); Algeria (1969); Nigeria (1971); Ecuador (1973) – suspended its membership from December 1992-October 2007; Angola (2007) and Gabon (1975–1994). OPEC had its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, in the first five years of its existence. This was moved to Vienna, Austria, on September 1, 1965. OPEC's objective is to co-ordinate and unify petroleum policies among Member Countries, in order to secure fair and stable prices for petroleum producers; an efficient, economic and regular supply of petroleum to consuming nations; and a fair return on capital to those investing in the industry.

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    • novembro 2017
      Fonte: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 15 novembro, 2017
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      Balance=OPEC crude oil production-Difference (a-b) Global oil demand, supply, oil market balance and required amounts of OPEC crude. World oil Demand World oil demand growth in 2017 is now expected to increase by 1.5 mb/d, representing an upward revision of around 30 tb/d from last previous report, mainly reflecting recent data showing an improvement in economic activities. Positive revisions were primarily a result of higher-than-expected oil demand from the OECD region and China. In 2018, world oil demand is anticipated to grow by 1.4 mb/d, following an upward adjustment of 30 tb/d over the previous report, due to the improving economic outlook in the world economy, particularly China and Russia. World Oil Supply Non-OPEC oil supply is expected to grow by 0.7 mb/d in 2017, following a downward revision of 0.1 m/bd from the previous report. In 2018, the growth in non-OPEC oil supply saw a downward revision of 60 tb/d to stand at 0.9 mb/d. OPEC NGLs and non-conventional liquids production are seen averaging 6.5 mb/d in 2018, representing an increase of 0.2 mb/d, broadly in line with growth in the current year. In September, OPEC crude oil production increased by 88 tb/d, according to secondary sources, to average 32.75 mb/d.   World Economy Growth in the world economy continues to improve, with the forecast for 2017 revised up to 3.6% from 3.5% in last month’s report. Similarly, the 2018 forecast has been adjusted higher to 3.5% from 3.4%. The improving momentum is visible in all economies, particularly the OECD, which is seen growing by 2.2% in 2017 and by an upwardly revised 2.1% in 2018. US growth in 2018 has been revised up to 2.3% and the EU to 1.9% for the same year. Russia has also seen an upward revision for 2018 to now stand at 1.6%, compared to 1.4% in the previous report. Growth expectations for India and China were left unchanged for both 2017 and 2018.
    • junho 2017
      Fonte: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 31 agosto, 2017
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      The OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin (ASB) provides detailed and comprehensive time-series data on many different aspects of the global petroleum industry, including production, demand, imports and exports, as well as exploration, production and transportation activities. The publication contains, in particular, key statistical data on oil and natural gas activities in each of OPEC’s 12 Member Countries: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Islamic Republic of Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela. Additionally, it provides valuable industry data for various countries with detailed classifications mainly by geographical region, and covers the major economic areas around the world. This year’s OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin (ASB), which is comprised of data up to the end of 2016, reveals the following important facts:In 2016, world crude oil production inched up by 0.35m b/d or 0.5 per cent as compared to 2015, to reach 75.48m b/d, marking a seventh consecutive year of growth. The majority of non-OPEC countries registered substantial declines in their 2016 average crude production, as compared to 2015. The biggest declines were for the United States, –0.54m b/d or –5.7 per cent and China, –0.31m b/d or –7.2 per cent. In 2016, the top three crude oil producing countries were Saudi Arabia (10.46m b/d), Russia (10.29m b/d) and the United States (8.88m b/d).World oil demand averaged at 95.12m b/d in 2016, up by 1.5 per cent year-on-year, with the largest increases in Asia and Pacific, particularly China and India, Western Europe, North America and Africa. 2016 oil demand in the Middle East remained flat year-on-year, while oil demand declined in Latin America for the second year in a row. Total OECD oil demand grew solidly for the second consecutive year in 2016, while oil demand in OPEC Member Countries declined for the first time since 1999, dropping by 0.20m b/d or 2.2 per cent, as compared to 2015, mainly as a result of declining oil demand in Venezuela, Ecuador, Saudi Arabia and IR Iran. Distillates and gasoline account for around 56 per cent of 2016 total world oil demand and are on increasing trends. Residual fuel oil requirements share in 2016 total oil demand amounts roughly to seven per cent, with requirements marking yearly gains for the first time since 2004. Gasoline dominates 2016 oil demand growth in Asia and Pacific and North America, while distillates are robust in Western and Eastern Europe. The 2016 OPEC Member Countries’ demand remained robust only in relation to residual fuel and declined for all other main petroleum categories, notably gasoline and distillates.Total exports of crude oil of OPEC Member Countries stood at 25.01m b/d in 2016 from 23.49m b/d in 2015. This increase represents a 6.5 per cent growth on a year-on-year basis. As in previous years, the bulk of crude oil from OPEC Members was exported to the Asia and Pacific region, 15.72m b/d or 62.9 per cent. Significant volumes of crude oil were also exported to North America, which increased its imports from OPEC Members from 2.81m b/d in 2015 to 3.29m b/d in 2016. Europe imported 4.21m b/d of crude oil from OPEC Members, 2.5 per cent less as compared to 2015 volumes. OPEC Members’ exports of petroleum products averaged 5.29m b/d during 2016, up by 0.90m b/d or 20.5 per cent as compared to 2015. OPEC Members’ imports of petroleum products stood at 2.06m b/d in 2016, roughly 0.15m b/d, or 6.7 per cent lower than in 2015.Total world proven crude oil reserves stood at 1,492bn b at the end of 2016, increasing slightly by 0.3 per cent from the previous year’s level of 1,488bn b. The largest additions came from Iraq, Venezuela and Norway. Total OPEC Members’ proven crude oil reserves increased 0.5 per cent to 1,217bn b at the end of 2016, with a share of 81.5 per cent of total world crude oil reserves. In 2016, proven natural gas reserves increased by 0.4 per cent at approximately 200.5 trillion standard cu m. This increase in natural gas reserves came on the back of new discoveries in the Middle East and Africa, almost solely relating to OPEC Members.World refinery capacity expanded by 0.45m b/cd to stand at 97.37m b/cd at the end of 2016, mainly supported by additions in North America and the Middle East, as well as Asia and Pacific regions. In the Middle East, expansions came from OPEC Members, while the United States, China and South Korea accounted for additions in North America and Asia and Pacific. 2016 refinery capacity in the OECD grew for the second consecutive year, mainly due to gains in the United States. Global refinery throughput ramped up by 1.7 per cent to reach 81.94m b/d in 2016 with largest gains in the Asia and Pacific and the Middle East. In the Middle East, the gains in refinery throughput originated in OPEC Member Countries. India, China and South Korea dominated the gains in the Asia and Pacific region.The OPEC Reference Basket averaged at $40.76/b in 2016, down from $49.49/b in 2015 and reaching the lowest yearly average since 2004. The yearly decline valued at $8.73/b or 17.6 per cent as compared to 2015. The 2016 volatility stood at $7.28/b or, equivalently, 17.9 per cent relative to the yearly average. The oil market remained mostly in contango since the 2H2014.
    • agosto 2017
      Fonte: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 20 novembro, 2017
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      The date has been considered the highest number although it has a range which are as. 2014- 2020 for 2020, 2020-2030 for 2030, 2030-2040 for 2040
    • agosto 2017
      Fonte: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Carregamento por: Knoema
      Acesso em 04 dezembro, 2017
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      1. Stock change assumptions reflect the development of Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPR) in some non-OECD countries, and the rising need for stocks as refinery capacity expands. These rates of rise in stocks will eventually slow, as growth in SPR slows as does refinery expansion. The medium-term pattern eventually reverts, in the long-term, to historical average behavior. 2. For Indicators, like Long term real GP growth rates the date has been considered the highest number although it has a range which are as. 2014- 2020 for 2020, 2020-2030 for 2030, 2030-2040 for 2040
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